Category: Money

Why “I Make More Money at the Office” is a Bad Excuse to Avoid Real Work

Why “I Make More Money at the Office” is a Bad Excuse to Avoid Real Work

It seems to me that as soon as we doctors are making any kind of decent money (which is usually immediately after graduating) we start looking for reasons to not do any actual work outside of the office.

Usually the reason given for this attitude is some version of “I can make way more at my job than what the (insert any type of manual laborer or domestic service provider) charges me per hour, so why would I not hire that out?” If we want to throw an extra layer of guilt on for anyone who might object, we say something like: “Well I have to pay someone to clean my house and cook my meals and cut my lawn so I have time to do things with my kids!”

Both of these excuses may have some superficial merit, but neither one holds much water when examined closely.

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What Does it Really Cost to Buy a House and Move?

What Does it Really Cost to Buy a House and Move?

We’re moving! It’s just across town, but still quite exciting for us. You can see from that banner photo that’s it’s also been pure chaos. More info about the house and why we decided to move can be found in this post.

The most obvious money-related part of this is the sticker price of the house. But it turns out the whole buy-a-house-and-move process is a conveyor belt of random fees and expenses, which in the end will make you realize that renting is awesome.

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Upsizing our House to Downsize our Life

Upsizing our House to Downsize our Life

In our ongoing efforts to be minimalist-ish, we decided last year that our small-town life was getting too big.

You may already know that we skip the use of our cars when we can, but even so our car commutes have started to annoy us in a big way. The main road in town that takes me to my office is getting more and more congested with each passing month, due to the ever-growing population here and some new high-density residential construction. My car commute is now well over 20 minutes during rush hour, which if you’ve done any research at all on happiness you know is a bad thing.

The interstate is the least-terrible route between our current house and my husband’s work, as well as our current house and Baby J’s daycare. Those drives are still in the 15-20 minute range, but if we’d wanted to spend time every day sitting on the interstate we would have moved to a big city. 

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On Renting and Roommates

On Renting and Roommates

One of the interesting things about modern American life is that it’s easy to find conversations and media reports lamenting the plight of any adult who rents their residence or has roommates. What was standard money-saving behavior in college – living in a small-ish, rented space with other human beings – is apparently pitiable if you are past your mid-twenties.

Meanwhile, the advertising machine that is the news media seems determined to convince us that we all need giant luxury living spaces, that wages are plummeting and housing costs are skyrocketing, that people choosing not to buy homes will cause the entire global economy to implode, and of course that Millennials are either to blame for all this or are the helpless victims of all this, depending on which article you read.

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Used Biking Gear and Other April Spending

Used Biking Gear and Other April Spending

Holy cow it’s mid-May! So it’s well past time to sum up what we spent in April.

A quick reminder: these spending reports are an effort to keep myself accountable to the idea that doctors do not have to spend a totally ridiculous amount of money to live well and love life. And while many people are happy to acknowledge that doctors over-spend, very few doctors are actually up for sharing their personal spending (not that I blame them – putting all this out there in public is an odd experience). That being said, we’re big believers in transparency. As a bonus, looking at our spending this critically makes us really have to evaluate if we’re putting our money where our values are.

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The Financial Life of a Computer Engineer

The Financial Life of a Computer Engineer

Our guest post today is from an awesome computer engineer who agreed to share some interesting financial, schooling, work, and investment details from his life so our young people can have a real-life story to consider when contemplating career choices. 

In case you were concerned that our guest-poster is a boring and out of shape nerd who spends his days indoors hunched over a keyboard, you should know that in addition to already kicking ass at personal financial management at the tender age of 28, Mr. Computer Engineer has completed over 10 long-distance running races, summited every single one of the 54 14ers in Colorado, and traveled all over the world to hike, climb, and ski. The photos in this post are his. 

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The Magic of the Non-Budget

The Magic of the Non-Budget

Let me say right off the bat that budgets can be great. Many people find success in their personal financial lives through meticulous budgeting. There are also many different types and varieties of budgeting strategies out there, so there may very well be one that will work amazingly well for your unique financial needs. None of this is intended to talk you out of budgeting if it is something that works for you.

However, I’m finding that not all people who are excited about personal finance are equally excited about traditional budgeting – myself and my husband included.

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